When you and your spouse get down to the brass tacks of your divorce, one of the things that may need to be decided is which of you will retain the country club membership. While there is no right or wrong answer for all circumstances, there are some important factors to consider when making this decision.

Let’s examine some of them below.

What does the country club membership represent to you?

If you are an avid golfer who takes to the links each weekend, your club membership might be an integral part of the way you relax and recreate. The same is true if you chair several club committees and rely on the club for your social activities.

If you can relate to the above scenarios, it might be worthwhile to strategize so that you receive the club membership in your divorce.

What are the terms of the membership?

This is vital to understand. If a membership is listed in one spouse’s name with the caveat “and family,” it might not be possible to transfer the membership from the named spouse to their soon-to-be ex-spouse’s name.

Some country clubs still follow antiquated rules of bygone centuries. If yours is one of them, it might not be possible for a divorced woman to retain a club membership solely in her name.

Do you have children who will be using it?

If you are divorcing in your 20s or 30s and have young children who love to swim in the pool and take golf and tennis lessons, it might be worthwhile to retain your membership as long as you are able to afford the fees. The kids will get a lot of mileage out of the club over the next dozen or so years, and that can be a deciding factor.

What stage of life are you in?

If you are getting a “gray divorce,” it is likely that you and your spouse have invested many years with this country club. Both of your social ties — and social status — may be closely linked to your membership and the friends you have made over the years. That alone can make it an asset worth fighting for.

Make a measured decision

Talking to your San Marcos family law attorney can help you reach a decision on whether it’s worth fighting for ownership of your country club membership.