When the courts finally set terms in your divorce, people say that they finalized your divorce. It can feel like a relief to get a final custody decree and know what to expect as far as parenting time with your children.

Having that final decree will make it easier for you to start planning for your future now that the divorce is behind you. However, don’t let the terminology here confuse you. Although the final custody order is official, that doesn’t mean you don’t have the opportunity to change them when your circumstances change. The Texas courts allow you to ask for more parenting time.

Maybe you were living in a weekly rental motel room after you and your spouse split up or perhaps you needed a chance to become more financially stable before you could cover the cost of truly providing for your children after the divorce. Now that some time has passed and your life is back on track, you have stable housing and the resources necessary to be present for your children. Demonstrating a change in your circumstances can be a justification to request a modification.

In theory, you and your ex can agree informally to increase your parenting time, although such informal arrangements leave you at their mercy to a degree. You can also go to the courts and have them formalize your verbal agreement with your ex or to increase your parenting time even if your ex doesn’t agree. A formal modification will change the custody order and potentially give you more time with your children. Your attorney can help you seek this modification.