Money, some would say, is a top cause of divorce in the United States. But it’s not just having money or even not having money that necessarily causes the split. In many cases, the problem is just the way that both people view it and the key points that they disagree on. 

For instance, one of the biggest issues is when two people have very different spending habits. Maybe you’re making more than you ever have and you feel like you should be putting aside a lot for the future. Your spouse, though, just wants to use all of the extra money to travel, buy expensive items that they don’t need and otherwise waste that extra income. The fundamental way that you see money is different, and it can end a marriage. 

The opposite side of the equation can also take a toll, though. Maybe you want to save everything and you control the banking, so you do it. You feel like you’re accomplishing great things for your family, but your spouse now feels like you’re dictating every aspect of their life and not letting them enjoy what the money can buy. They’re unhappy, but you can’t understand why because you think you’re providing for them. They don’t see it that way. 

Inequalities in earning can also cause trouble. Say you make $15,000 per month and your spouse makes $15,000 per year. Do you share all of your money? Or do you track who earned what and get into arguments about how it can be used? 

Even the very wealthy can run into a lot of these money issues, and that can lead to divorce. Make sure you know what steps to take if it does