One difficult aspect of divorce for people in Texas might be keeping talk of the divorce out of the office, but it is necessary to do so. The stress of divorce can negatively affect a person’s work performance, and talking about the divorce or other personal issues at work may cause problems later if any coworkers are deposed as part of the process.

First, people should work on their scheduling. They should let their attorney know when travel or other work commitments make them unavailable for court appearances. If they have an assistant, that person should be aware that court appearances should not be rescheduled. A divorcing individual should also set aside time to deal with legal matters instead of trying to cope with each issue as it arises.

Confidentiality is important. People should not leave hard copy documents where others can see them. Personal email should be used for communication instead of work email. In addition, digital documents related to the divorce should be placed in a master folder that can be accessed easily. It may be necessary to get documents from human resources, and people should try to request several at once to cut down on the workload created. Business partners of co-owners may also need to provide documentation.

In a high-asset divorce, the property division process may be particularly complex. Each spouse in a community property state like Texas is entitled to an equal share of the marital assets. If one spouse owns a business, this can mean first having it valuated and then deciding whether to buy out the other spouse or sell the business. Some collections, such as jewelry, art or coins, can provide challenges for appraising their value. To divide pension plans and 401(k)s, a complicated document called a qualified domestic relations order must be approved by the plan administrator.